The latest offering from the American director of iconic movies such as “Dead Man” and “Ghost Dog” allows us to bring you a tattooed gallery dedicated to the “undead”

It’s been doing the rounds for some time now,“The Dead Don’t Die”, the new film from the eclectic director Jim Jarmusch to which we pay homage here with a gallery dedicated to the best zombie tattoos.

Sergio Sanchez, Timeline Gallery, San Pedro, USA
Sergio Sanchez, Timeline Gallery, San Pedro, USA

The story takes place in Centreville (an imaginary American town) and tells of an invasion of dangerous and grotesque “undead” in the wake of an ecological disaster which has broken the two poles and consequently spun the Earth off its axis.

Julian Siebert, Corpsepainter Tattoo, Munich, Germany
Julian Siebert, Corpsepainter Tattoo, Munich, Germany

The new movie by Jarmusch was premiered on May 14 last competing at the 72nd edition of the Cannes Film Festival, but the reaction of the critics has been less than encouraging, to say the least.

In fact, the movie – and it pains us to admit it – is no great shakes in cinematographic terms, but has an outstanding cast including Bill Murray (police chief Cliff Robertson), the ever more in demand Adam Driver (in the role of agent Ronald Peterson), the inevitable Tilda Swinton (Zelda Winston), the ever lovely Chloë Sevigny (agent Minerva Morrison), Steve Buscemi (Miller), Danny Glover (Hank Thompson), musician Iggy Pop (one of the many zombies), RZA of the Wu-Tang Clan (Dean) and, naturally, American icon Tom
Waits in a marvellous, memorable performance as Hermit Bob.

All that is missing is “depth” complain various trade magazines. The references to other horror movies (whether the first of them all “Night of the Living Dead” from George Romero or the spoof “Return of the Living Dead” directed by Dan O’ Bannon) just weren’t enough to make this deadpan movie anything more than deadbeat.

Even though, as some rightly point out, though this film by Jarmuschhas its faults, but also honesty and coherence. Basically, there is no humankind to put on guard, time’s up and all that’s is left is to do give our best in the tragic finale”.

Other critics have noted that “the political subtext is incisive even though the plot doesn’t quite stand up. You can’t simply take a great song (“The Dead Don’t Die” by country artist Sturgill Simpson which features in the movie, ed.) and go and build a film around it, putting a bit of everything you like into the mix. Not even if your name is Jim Jarmusch”.